Maxtoch Xsword L2Kd

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Maxtoch L2Kd review: dual cell LEP flashlight test

Maxtoch Xsword L2Kd specifications

Brand/modelMaxtoch Xsword L2Kd
LEPMirror type LEP
Max. Lumens650 lm
Max. Beam intensity / distance3200 meters (2,560,000)
Battery config.2*21700
Onboard chargingN/A
Modes3
BlinkiesN/A
ReflectorN/A
WaterproofIPX8
Review dateJune 2022

Introduction:

If you look at our list of best performing LEP flashlights, you’ll notice that Maxtoch is covering many spots. And that’s for a reason. Their main focus is on gear for hunters, and so, they also focus on long-range flashlights. And they have been making LEP flashlights for several years, probably since 2018, and were therefore one of the first manufacturers using an LEP module as their lightsource.

LEP stands for Laser Excited Phosphor, which has a laser at the base of the light source. A phosphor layer turns the blue laser into a white-looking beam, and an aspheric lens helps to concentrate the light into a far-reaching beam.

The L2Kd is an upgraded version of the L2K, and the D stands for Diamond. More on that later.

Package quality.

Maxtoch ships its lights in a simple brown carton box, with a specially designed carry bag for the flashlight. Inside this little bag, you can find the following. (BTW, I got one without the charger and batteries)

  • The flashlight: Maxtoch Xsword L2Kd (in short: Maxtoch L2Kd)
  • Holster
  • Lanyard
  • 2 spare o-rings
  • 3 colored filters (red/yellow/green)
  • Manual

Flashlight in use

The L2Kd is long with only one switch at the tail cap, so you likely have to operate it with both hands. When you hold the flashlight overhand, you might have difficulty pressing the button with the flat part of your thumb. The only way to activate the switch is by pressing it with the tip of your finger/thumb.

If you’re a hunter, you can also get the optional remote switch, which would eliminate this problem.

The Maxtoch L2Kd is too long for a pocket clip, but the package includes a rubber tactical ring and a holster. Maxtoch also sells some optional gun mounts, so you won’t have to stick to 1 way of carrying or attaching it.

I have to say that the body is a little bit on the slippery side for everyday carry, but that’s not the purpose this light was built for. It’s a hunting light, so the slipperiness needs to be taken with a grain of salt. There is some redding around the body, but it’s nothing like the aggressive knurling found on some tactical flashlights.

My package included 3 colored filters:green, yellow and red. These are lenses you have to put between the bezel and the front glass. They don’t have a threaded bezel around the filter, as you see with some other brands. Replacing these filters in the dark can be tricky because of this, and they are easier to drop or get your greasy fingerprints on. I’m curious why they chose to do this.

Another thing I noticed is the watery grease? lubriation Maxtoch is using on these threads. When I unscrew the tailcap, there is some light grease (lube) on the switch retaining ring. It looks like they are using very thin lube, which becomes a bit too thin after using it. So I’d recommend to wipe it off and add your own lubrication.

Build Quality, and Warranty

The build quality looks the same as the other Maxtoch flashlights we reviewed, including the L2K , L2Ks, L3K, Owleyes Pro, etc. This means there is some machining and design elements, but there hasn’t been put much thought into it. But again, this flashlight is likely getting beat up while hunting, so it doesn’t need to be designed extremely nice like your average EDC.

The anodization on the flashlight seems adequate, and the bezel is red, just like the other Maxtochs I have.

The bezel, tailcap, and battery tube can all be removed without too much trouble. The threads near the tailcap have 1 o-ring to keep the water out, while the original L2K had 2 o-rings.

Maxtoch warranty:

Maxtoch offers a 1-year warranty if the problem is caused by normal usage. But there is a lifetime warranty for repairs with no labor charges as long as parts are available. You will only be charged for the parts needed to repair the light. Accessories like lanyards, holsters, etc are not covered by this warranty. More info can be found here: https://maxtoch.com/pages/–14

LEP, Lens, Bezel, Beam, and Reflector

From the outside, the L2Kd looks like your average long-range flashlight, but on the inside is not. Instead of using an LED on top of an MCPCB, the L2Kd uses an LEP module, that turns a blue laser beam into a white beam, using a layer of phosphor. In this process, you will be able to see some tint shifts throughout the beam, with possible blueish rings/tints, depending on the distance to the object you’re pointing the light at.

Objects close to you might show a blueish beam, while objects far away show a cleaner white or yellow beam color. This has to do with the mirror-type LEP module, focusing the laser onto the phosphor and then converging the beam with a convex lens.

If you have OCD for color shifts in beams or are just a tint snob, you better grab a cup of coffee and continue reading your newspaper. LEPs are not the best choice for you. Get a LED-based flashlight with your preferred beam color and be done with it.

If you compare it to the L2K, you wouldn’t notice too many differences. It’s a bit shorter, but the main difference is on the inside. At its base, you can find a new type LEP module, with phosphor made of diamond (Other sellers/manufacturers call this crystal).

All LEP flashlights use convex lenses to focus the beam. But not all of them have a normal lens in front of the convex lens. This means that your most important piece of glass (actually plastic) is damaged when you accidentally hit it at the front. But fortunately, the L2Kd has a protective lens placed in front of the convex lens.

It also has the typical red bezel, with a zigzag pattern, looking almost like teeth. Removing the bezel itself isn’t a problem because it doesn’t have any glue, and is supposed to be removed if you want to use the colored filters. These filters fit right behind the bezel, in front of the convex lens and glass lens.

Dimensions and size comparison

Dimensions: 

.MillimetersInches
Length250 mm9.84″
Head diameter60 mm2.36 “
Body diameter24.4 mm1 “
Tailcap diameter30 mm1.18 “

Weight

.Weight in gramsWeight inOz.
Without battery:337.2 grams11.89 oz.
With 2 Maxtoch batteries484 grams17.07 oz.

Throw Flashlight comparison

Size compared to other Maxtoch LEP flashlights

Image 1, from left to right: Maxtoch Owleyes W PRO, Maxtoch L2Kd, Maxtoch L2K, Maxtoch L3K, Maxtoch LA60

Head comparison between the L2K and L2Kd

Driver & User Interface:

The L2Kd has 3 modes, High, Medium, and Low, without any blinky modes.

Available modes:

  • High, Medium, Low (in that order)

From OFF:

  • Half-press: momentary-on (keep tapping to change modes from High to Low)
  • Single-click: to last used mode, mode memory

From ON:

  • Half-press: doesn’t work
  • Single-click: the flashlight turns off

Mode memory:

  • Yes

Blinky modes menu:

  • None

Low battery warning:

  • No, but the output will decrease, which is a clear indicator that you need to replace the batteries.

Lock-out mode:

  • Not necessary with just 1 mechanical switch

PWM:

  • If there is any, it’s not visible by normal use.

Batteries & Charging

Mine didn’t come with the charger and batteries

But, when you order the kit, you also get a Maxtoch C2 Lithium battery charger with 2 slots. The charger has a Micro USB port, but they might have upgraded the charger since I reviewed the L2K. See for more details about the included charger and batteries, the L2K and L3K review instead.

Just keep in mind, the light will only work with shorter, button top cells, because the longer ones might be too long to screen down the tailcap. If you order the batteries along with it, you should be good to go.

Performance test

Lumen measurements:

All output numbers are relative to my homemade Integrating Sphere. It is set up with an Extech SDL400 Lux Meter for measurements including a Kenko PRO1D ND-16 filter. The base measurement is done with a Convoy S2+ that has been tested at 255 lumens.

All of my readings were taken with fully-charged Samsung 40T batteries. I also tested it with the Maxtoch batteries, and they were very close.

ModeSpecs@ turn on@ 30 sec@ 10 min
Low100 lm174 lm171 lm166 lm
Med300 lm354 lm348 lm333 lm
High650 lm563 lm548 lm515 lm

Low and Medium mode performed much better than specs, but High mode performed quite a bit below spec.

Parasitic drain:

  • It has a mechanical switch, so there shouldn’t be any parasitic drain from the driver.

Runtime: Battery life

The runtime test was done with the 50cm integrating sphere, including the Kenko Pro1D ND-16 filter and Extech SDL400 data logging Lux Meter.

ModeSpecified runtimeMeasured runtime (ANSI FL1)Time till shut off
Low9h10min9h10min9h10min
Med4h40min4h45min4h45min
High2h40min2h43min2h43min

ANSI FL1 standards: The runtime is measured until the light drops to 10% of its initial output (30 seconds after turning on). This does not mean that the flashlight is not usable anymore. The last column shows how long the light actually works till it shuts off. If there is a + symbol, it means that the test was stopped at that particular point, but the light was actually still running. This happens on certain occasions, with certain drivers, firmware, or batteries.

Throw Measurement: Peak beam intensity and beam distance

Measurements were taken outdoors at 20 meters with a Hagner E4-X Lux Meter. I recorded the measurements 30 seconds after turn on with 2 sets of Samsung 40T batteries. I then also retested it at 30 meters to reconfirm the measurements.

ModeSpecsCandela measuredin Metersin Yardsi Miles
Low1,052,000205122431.27
Med2,036,000285431211.77
High3200 meters3,020,000347638012.16
High 30 meters3,042,000348838152.17
High 30 meters3,051,000 cd3493 meters3820 yards2.17 miles

The difference between the 2 measurements at 30 meters was only 1 lux.. This is a great flashlight to show the difference between a 1 Mcd, 2Mcd, and 3Mcd beam.

Extra info: Peak beam distance according to ANSI FL1 standards: The calculated value of distance in meters at which the flashlight produce a light intensity of 0.25 lux. (0.25 lux is about the brightness of a full moon shining on an object).

A list of all the largest LEP flashlights we reviewed, including multiple cell setups: These numbers are NOT from the specifications but measured by our reviewers. They include the bigger LEP flashlights with a large diameter head (about 45mm and above). The numbers include the measurement in lumens (lm), measure candela (cd), and calculated distance in meters, and yards. These numbers are all measured 30 seconds after turning on.

FlashlightBattery@30sec (lm)Candela (cd)MetersYards
Acebeam W30217004981,312,00022912505
Astrolux WP2217003031,248,00022342443
Astrolux WP3217004452,412,00031063397
Jetbeam M1X WP-RX217004912,280,00030203302
Jetbeam RRT M1X Raptor 21700267880,00018762052
Lumintop Thor 3217003111,728,00026292875
Maxtoch Owleyes W PRO2*217009663,996,00039984372
Maxtoch LA602*217004562,272,00030153297
Maxtoch L2K2*217004452,508,00031673464
Maxtoch L2KD2*217005483,051,00034933820
Maxtoch L2KS217004422,308,00030383323
Maxtoch L3K2*217004841,908,00027633021
Nextorch T20L217009751,284,00022662478
Unbranded 26650 LEP26650533992,00019922179
Weltool W4217004502,184,00029563232

And below is an interactive throw comparison graph (candela), between all the bigger LEP flashlights with a head larger than 45mm.

Interactive graph

Hover your mouse over the interactive graph below to see the details of each specific light. (tip: hold your mobile phone horizontally to see the full graph)

Beamshots

For the following beamshots I used a Canon EOS 5D Mk2 and a 100mm lens. manual settings: ISO1600, .5sec , F4, 5000K

The tower is about 450 meters / 492 yards away.

Disclaimer: This flashlight was sent to me for review at no cost by Maxtoch. I have not been paid to review, nor have I been holding back on problems or defects.

Final Verdict

Pros

  1. Reaching over 2 miles / 3kilometers
  2. Plenty bright for an LEP
  3. Modes are spaces at 1 Mcd, 2Mcd, and 3Mcd
  4. Performs better than specs

Cons

  1. Not as good-looking as some of its competitors
  2. The red filter reduces the visibility a lot (not very useful)

Explanation on star ratings:

1: Avoid: my phone flashlight would be a better choice – 2: Poor: significant defect or issues; almost unusable – 3: Average: some defects or issues; but still usable 4: Good: recommended (minor issues) – 5: Great: highly recommended

Reviewer Marco
Author: Marco

5 stars: ★★★★★

I have to admit that it’s not the prettiest flashlight out there, but it surely is one of the best flashlight throwers on planet earth. It beats all the other single-cell and double-cell flashlights. Except for it’s bigger dual-head Owleyes W PRO. But that’s a totally different beast.

The L2Kd is a nice improvement over the dual-cell L2K, L3K, and LA60, with a new and improved LEP module, but with the same simple UI.

If you have held off to find an LEP doing over 2 miles, 3 kilometers, or 3 million candela… wait no longer: The L2Kd is what you are looking for.

Maxtoch L2Kd discount code

Get $40 off with the following code: 2KDIAMOND

1lumen selects and reviews products personally. We may earn affiliate commissions through our links, which help support our testing.